Montreal Canadiens: Five Former Habs Who Looked Odd In New Colors

TORONTO, ON - JANUARY 28: Guy Lafleur #10 of the New York Rangers skates against the Toronto Maple Leafs during NHL game action on January 28, 1989 at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Toronto tied New York 1-1. (Photo by Graig Abel/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON - JANUARY 28: Guy Lafleur #10 of the New York Rangers skates against the Toronto Maple Leafs during NHL game action on January 28, 1989 at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Toronto tied New York 1-1. (Photo by Graig Abel/Getty Images) /
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TORONTO, ON – OCTOBER 10: Guy Lafleur #10 (Photo by Graig Abel/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON – OCTOBER 10: Guy Lafleur #10 (Photo by Graig Abel/Getty Images) /

1. Guy Lafleur

Guy Lafleur was one of the best player to ever wear a Habs sweater. He was the first overall pick in the 1971 NHL Draft, was from the province of Quebec, dominated for the Quebec Remparts as a Junior before being drafted by the Canadiens and became a superstar in a Habs jersey.

Like the Richard’s and Beliveau before him, it looked like Lafleur would spend his entire career with Montreal. Lafleur started slowly, before becoming one of the most dynamic scorers in the league by the end of the 1970’s. The Canadiens won four straight Stanley Cups from 1976-79 and in those four seasons, Lafleur led the league in points three times, won two Hart Trophy’s as league MVP and took home a Con Smythe as Playoff MVP.

In 58 playoff games during those four years, Lafleur had 36 goals, 51 assists and 87 points. He was the unquestioned offensive leader on one of the best teams to ever hit the ice.

Lafleur ranks second behind Maurice Rocket for most goals scored by a Canadiens player (518) and holds the all-time record for most points (1246). Lafleur had six consecutive seasons where he scored at least 119 points for the Habs. However, by the middle of the 1980’s, he was slowing down. After starting the 1984-85 season with five points in 19 games, Lafleur retired.

He was only 33 years old, but when he went from one of the most feared scorers in the hockey world to a struggling player being pushed down the lineup, he called it quits. It appeared at the time that he had played his whole career with the Canadiens and would be a Hall of Famer in the future.

However, after sitting out for nearly four seasons, Lafleur decided to make a comeback. He would play for the New York Rangers in 1988-89 and, even worse, he would wear the Quebec Nordiques colors for the following two seasons.

Lafleur in a Rangers sweater is odd enough, but the leading scorer of all-time in a Canadiens uniform wearing a Nordiques sweater? Even 30 years later it seems strange.